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quorum call: mr. lieberman: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. lieberman: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, i have come to the floor to express my own sense of encouragement about the statements made this afternoon by president obama and senator mcconnell, which indicate that the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff are making progress. and we're not there yet, but they're making progress. and i'm really encouraged by that. i've heard over the last couple of days a familiar phrase invoked many times, and it is that "no deal is better than a bad deal." and i suppose it's often true that no deal is better than a bad deal, but in the case of the fiscal cliff, no deal is the worst deal because the government will go over the fiscal cliff and will take almost every american with us. almost every family that pays taxes now will pay higher taxes. people's jobs will immediately be p
on the bridges in connecticut to make this system to attract the ridership that we need to make that, those cost savings and that calculation work. >> i guess what i'm referring to also is the fact that the $4 billion in revenue that is projected, that's just one number, one benefit, one source. it's certainly far from what we should be talking about obvious. everybody knows that, but the more you can give us, the more you can parse this, different angles you might take. i'm sure it's all going to be helpful. >> and we will absolutely do that with amtrak and our partners at the u.s. dot. >> thank you. my time is up. >> any further questions from any members of the committee? seeing none, i'd like to thank each of our witnesses for your testimony today. i ask unanimous consent at the record of today's agreement open until such time as our witnesses have provided answers to any questions that have been submitted to them in writing. and unanimous consent the record remain open for 15 days for additional comments and information submitted by members for which it is to be included in the record of to
. >> reaction to the newtown, connecticut, school shootings continued today on capitol hill. from the senate floor, this is 40 minutes. >> mr. president, we appear to be in one of those periods of time where we're walking too often through the valley of the shadow of death. senator bloomen tall and i come to the floor to speak.the tragedy that occurred, the senseless, horrific attacks on innocent people in newtown, connecticut, last friday, but we must also note with extraordinary respect and a sense of love, the depth of our truly beloved colleague, senator dan inouye of hawaii. americas, as senator read and senator durbin made so clear, america has lost a true hero, patriot. this senate has lost a great leader, a leader whose accomplishments have been literally historic, and i think all of us have lost a friend. last evening, senator kaka spoke about how dan inouye's legacy -- i'm paraphrasing here -- was all around hawaii, and all that he had done for the state. the truth is i think that most every state in the country is full of legacies of the service of dan inouye. i know it's true of
of connecticut to be united states district judge. the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: madam president, the senate is finally being allowed to vote today on the nomination of michael shea to be a district judge in the united states district court for district -- the district of connecticut. it has taken a long time for this day to come but he will be confirmed, and i congratulate him and his family on his confirmation and i congratulate the two senators from connecticut for finally having this come to a vote. i mention this not to urge that we confirm him because we will and i will very proudly vote for him, but michael shea is another nominee whose nomination was stalled for months for no good reason. the judiciary committee and the distinguished presiding officer serves on that committee will call we gave his nomination strong bipartisan support, more than seven months ago. he has the support of both home state senators, both senator lieberman and senator blumenthal. he has significant litigation experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked
. and then a discussion on the school shootings in newtown, connecticut. later, we will re-air gary locke on the relationship between the two countries, china and the united states. tomorrow morning, a form on the consumer credit report. and oversight of the credit reporting market. the that live at c-span3 at 10 eastern senator daniel inouyebie died yesterday at the age of 88. this is a little bit more than a half-hour. >> is he was a colleague but really a friend. he helped me so many times, helped me do my best here, my best has been with the help of him. as i mentioned briefly yesterday, he always had so much confidence in me. years ago, years ago when i was a senator struggling, like all senators here, he told me two decades ago that i would be running the senate someday. i never even contemplated, thought about that, desired that. things have worked out that he was right. senator inouye is one of the amerir inouye is one of the >> senator inouye, he is one of the finest men i have ever known. a real americano hero. my friend, who is on the floor, the system leader, has told hiss sto
cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gone into a catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and began playing anti-catholic records on portable phonographs and distributing literature, and they were arrested for disturbing the peace and preaching without a permit, and appealed their case all the way to the supreme court which said that because connecticut said, well, individual city administrators would decide what a valid program was for religious organizations and would allow them or not on to the streets, they said that allows too much discretion by the state government, and they applied for the first time part of that first amendment, this time, the free exercise clause, as against the state of connecticut, and overturned their law that allowed city officials to license or not as they saw fit. >> host: and did that lead to any nationwide movements, or was it a well publicized case at the time? >> guest: it was a relatively well publicizedded case at the time. the really big movements came when jehova's witnesses, again, required laws to h
into a plane and it took an hour and a half to fled northampton to flood into the connecticut river. in the of the region's the 600 million gallons of water went through a williamsburg williamsburg, skinnerville and hated bill 15 minutes each. the worst industrial disaster at the time. over $1 million of property damage was sustained almost a hundred people left homeless and 139 were killed my input book is about the only village not be built skinnerville and william skinner. what set his story apart is the success and he achieved after the disaster. skinnerville had the worst destruction, it was obliterated from the face of the earth and a one. left, his house was the only one left standing and he lost more financially than any other individual he lost the equivalent of $35 million. he was ruined but because he made choices that nobody else would make he could come back. the other manufacturers in a the valley could not rebuild successfully. they had gone out of business, a bankruptcy, and sold businesses and left town. historian said three years later men of abundance could withst
interesting case called cantwell against connecticut's involved a group of what this is that had gone into a catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and begin planning anticatholic records on a portable photographs and distributing literature and they were a arrested for disturbing the peace if preaching without a permit and they appealed their case all the way to the supreme court which said the because conn said individual cities administrators will decide what a valid program was for the religious organizations and would allow them or not onto the streets and they applied for the first time this time the free exercise clause against the state of connecticut and overturn the law that allowed the city officials as they saw fit. >> and did that lead to any nationwide movement or was it a well-publicized case? >> it was a relatively well publicized case, a really big movement came when the jehovah's witnesses again challenged law requiring school children to salute the flag every morning to say the pledge of allegiance and the first thing when they got to the supreme cou
, and the town took about an hour and a half to flood into the town and into the connecticut river. in the upper regions of the valley where the land is sweeper, that water went through the villages in about 15 minutes each. it resulted in the worst industrial disaster in american history at the time. over a million dollars worth of property damage was sustained, almost 800 people were left homeless x139 people -- and 139 people were killed. my book is about the only village that wasn't rebuilt, skinnerville. and the man at the center of that village, william skinner. and what sets skinner's story apart is the success he achieved after this disaster. now, skinnerville suffered the worst destruction of all. it was considered to have been obliterated from the face of the earth. there wasn't a brick left of skinner's mill, his house was very nearly the only one left standing, and he lost more financially than any other individual. in those 15 minutes, he lost the equivalent of $35 million. he was ruined. but because he was willing to make choices that no one else was willing to make, he was able to
and the gentleman from connecticut also wish to speak. mr. president, senators -- their states who have been very hard hit should have the opportunity to speak. i'm going to take my rebuttal of the coburn amendments and just abbreviate them. with the exception of being willing to accept the amendment where you can't get emergency assistance if you are a tax cheater or if you've passed away, with the exception of a funeral benefit i really object to the coburn amendment. my objections have been so well articulated by the gentleman from new york, mr. schumer; by the gentleman from new jersey, mr. menendez, i'm not going to preet them. i'm going to ask unanimous consent that my written rebuttals be in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. mikulski: and in the interest of time, i think we're all agreed the very intent to save money by adding delay and bureaucracy will cost money and will cost time in terms of getting people back on their feet in both their home and in their livelyhoods because remember what we seek here. helping people get their life back and helping get their liv
board the am a&m amistad. the men were eventually sent to prison in connecticut where they awaited a trial heard by the supreme court. their case defended by john quincy adamss resulted in their release and return to africa. this is a little over an hour. >> greetings, everyone. greetings. good to see you here. thank you for coming out. i'd like to begin with very warm thanks to brian. brian, where are you? there he is back there. brian, has done a lot to make this happen. also thanks to anna for the generous introduction, and i'd say we should also give a round of applause to the staff of this museum, which keeps america's maritime heritage alive. [applause] >> now, i'm very happy to have a chance to talk with you this evening about a part of that maritime heritage which is not always included in america's history of the seas. i want to talk to you about this book that i've written, "the amistad bee bellon" and i want to remind everybody what happened in that story. just led me summarize what happened. the year is 1839. and this slave schooner, amistad, which in spanish means, "fr
in connecticut where they awaited a trial heard by the sprinkler. the case was defended by john quincy adams and resulted in the release and return to africa. this is a little over one hour. >> greetings, everyone. i would like to begin with a very warm thanks to brian. there is brian back there. he has done so much to make this happen. also, thank you to emma for the generous introduction. and also we should give a round of applause the staff of this museum's maritime heritage, who keeps his heritage alive. [applause] now, i'm very happy to have a chance to talk with you this evening about a part of that heritage, which is not only concluding america's history. i want to talk to you about this book that i have written, "the amistad rebellion." i want to begin by reminding everybody just what happened in that story. okay? does let me summarize what happened. the year is 1839. this sleek schooner, la amistad, which in spanish means friendship. it contains 53 enslaved africans. men and children, including three little girls. they are being carried from hosanna to another part of cuba where the
will be senator blumenthal from connecticut. we are so delighted that you could be here. go right ahead. >> thank you very much. i want to thank you and ranking member and half for today's hearing. my colleagues to have stated so eloquently what happened in new york and new jersey, connecticut , share their faith although the lack -- national media coverage may give the impression that connecticut's damage was more a footnote to the main story. in fact, the destruction and damage in connecticut was every bit as real, and the pockets of destruction as pervasive as elsewhere, and i think many of the lessons learned the you heard here form a pattern that we need to invest now or pay later. there are measures that we can take now to minimize the damage in the future, and we cannot be penny wise to avoid those measures going forward, and the other lesson that i think it's striking here is that our efforts have to be complementary, not competitive. we are mutually supportive in this effort. i have been asked repeatedly, argue in competition with new jersey and new york? the answer is emphatically now.
the tragedies of the sort that struck in newtown, connecticut, to avoid such events in the future. like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we've been discussing all of the various options available to protect our children, and at this point we would like to share our thinking with you. and for that purpose i'd like to introduce wayne louisiana pierre, our executive vice next week we will be available to any of you, so contact us, please, at that point. thank you very much. wayne? >> good morning. the national rifle association, four million mothers, fathers, sons and daughters, joined the nation in horror, outrage, grief and earnest prayer for the families of newtown, connecticut. who have suffered such an incomprehensible loss as a result of this unspeakable crime. out of respect for the families and until the facts are known, the nra has refrained from comment. while some have tried to exploit tragedy for political gain, we have remained respectively silent. now we must speak for the safety of our nation's children. because for all the noise and anger dir
suffered more than the people of connecticut from hurricane sandy i know you will hear about that from your representatives. we did suffer in connecticut. the second is we are part of a critically important economic region, critically important for the country, certainly in terms of the fiscal strength of the country, but much more. part of what i hope he will keep in mind is helpless revitalize this center of economic strength which really benefits the entire country. going to connecticut we suffered an estimated $600 million in damage great. it's evidence by the photos of the year. what is most interesting is the photo on the left which is a house in danbury. most assume that the damage occurred on the coast. up in the northwest part of the state quite far from the water, but there was a tremendous wind, and it knocked down the tree which devastated this house and a lot of power in these areas. the other photos to the right, fairfield, by the beach. the water came we in. bottom left, you have a house which relief voting them of flooded creek and the end to the right in bridgeport just a s
of the civilian pension connecticut affect medicaid and lots of other programs like that and the budget cut likes the idea because it saves money. it doesn't save that much at first but it saves a lot of money over time and i guess a little for to entered the league in the first ten years and more after that the savings continue to grow and grow. advocates for older americans don't like this idea very much at all because the savings are so big that means they are getting less money each month and in their benefits each year. >> so there's the question of what it means for the retirees beneficiary right now in the next couple of years and the on going into the future and then the president sending the measure of what would mean across the government. what do democrats think of this? you mentioned might be amenable to it but what about the house democrats, where do they stand? >> you had congressman larsen on here and you heard what he said not including social security and peace talks. that is a common belief of opinion among the democrats on the hill and in both the senate and house of would be a
and wrote for the greenwich, connecticut, newspaper. and he came back and went to work for the voice of america, writing press dispatches to they very quickly was diverted to an effort to found a new veterans organization. it's kind of an interesting story, too, called the american veterans committee which was intended to be a new organization for turning veterans just some world war ii. they envisioned it as a progressive organization, integrated, unlike the vfw and the foreign legion. and the other one spent american legion. >> thank you. the american legion. anyway, that kept him occupied for a couple of years, and then he had a career in publishing. he was at the end of his life a freelance writer. he was a writer. the other two, hayward became an architect. he was a very good drawer. everywhere they went he would draw pictures. and he was an ornithologist vicki would draw pictures of birds. the third guy, bill, they came from remains, involving -- the defense department, so he, he was interested in politics all the way along and he stayed involved working for the american govern
jersey but also connecticut and not just in this disaster, but also going back to 2011 and the catastrophe the connecticut suffered, three of them in that period of time when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. so i want the people of connecticut to know they have real friend in the senator from louisiana and your leadership has been really tremendous in this area. thank you to senator vitter as well. i want to just briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership he has in the -- wake of disasterrer in the connecticut. he promptly declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the sba to come forward along with fema and i want to thank the folks who came from sba, the people on the ground who have been there for quite some time now. .. >> i think you need to know that the connecticut office has already approved about 7 million in disaster assistance for struggling businesses in connecticut, as well as residents. that figure is significant. there are a large number of requests for funding that are still being processe
. lieberman: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut is recognized. mr. lieberman: i ask further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, my fourth and final term as united states senator will soon come to an end. as i reflect on that reality, i am of course filled with many emotions, but the one that i feel most is gratitude. gratitude first to god, creator of life and law, whose -- without whose loving kindness nothing would be possible. gratitude to america, this extraordinary land of opportunity which has given someone like me so many opportunities. gratitude to the people of connecticut who have entrusted me with the privilege of public service for 40 years, the last 24 in the united states senate. gratitude to my senate colleagues whom i've come to know as friends and with whom it has been such an honor to serve. gratitude to all the people without whose help, hard work and support i never would have made it to the senate or stayed here. the gifted and hardw
shooter at sandy hook elementary school in you intown, connecticut. it's heartbreaking to listen to the stories of innocent lives cut cruelly short. the pain and grief of the families and friends of these students and teachers are unimaginable. i just want to echo some of the comments that senator durbin made and senator leahy made. we know that the teachers and the aides put their life on the line in order to try to save children. the unbelievable task of the first responders coming to the scene, not knowing what they would find, we send our prayers to all. this is a tragedy beyond words, and i think president obama said it best last night that our hearts are broken. but as senator durbin has said and senator leahy, i particularly want to thank you, we need to take action. congress needs to come together and take action to protect the safety of our children. we must do better. there have been too many episodes in which children's lives and others have been lost that we must figure out ways to do things, to act to prevent these types of tragedies. this conversation must include a
. i yield the floor. mr. lieberman: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator connecticut. mr. lieberman: thank the chair. mr. president, in a short while the senate will vote on two nominees for service in the executive branch of our government, and i rise today to speak in support of one of those two, which is william b.a.e., -- william baer, who's been nominated to serve as assistant attorney general, managing the antitrust division of the u.s. department of justice. mr. president, i happen to have come to know bill baer personally, because practices flaw a firm with a very good friend and neighbor of mine here in washington. and in that remarks i can certainly testify to the -- and in that regard, i can certainly testify to the fact that he's an honorable, interesting, enjoyable person, but that alone doesn't qualify him to hold this high office. he has extraordinary experience. i would say that he is very, very widely acknowledged as one of the best antitrust lawyers in our country, and i would say that this nomination is really a merit-selection nomination. and i'll get
online. like us on facebook. next in light of the recent school shooting in connecticut on friday, award winning journalist david cohen presents his book columbine. the comprehensive account that took place in ninth. it's about forty minutes. dave cohen who are eric and dylan. >> the two killers at columbine. >> and eric was a psychopath and dylan was not. they were completely different people. and, you know, as i spent ten years on the book, and the question i get asked most often is why do d they do it. it took me a year to figure out it's in the wrong question. there's eric why he did it and there's dialynn. they are different people. do you want to talk about each one? eric was a psychopath. >> eric harris? >> yes. he was the mastermind of the plot. he spent a couple of years trying to figure out how he could destroy the entire world. that was his "fantasy" as a 16-year-old boy. wipe out humanitarian. only leave three or four or five people. the power of life as well as death makes it more powerful. a god can give life as well as take it away. and they are not delusional where they t
of the horrific shooting in newtown, connecticut, on friday, it was impossible for me not to react not just as a senator, but as a parent, as a father. and as my wife and i spent the weekend reflecting on the heartbreaks loss of 20 innocent children and 6 of their teachers and faculty, as we talked to our own three young children about what had happened, we thought about the grief, the anguish. a whole range of different parents deeply touched by this tragic incident. the first, of course, are the parents who lost their precious, innocent children. their six- and seven-year olds in the massacre at sandy hook elementary school last friday. parents like joel and joann baker who lost their precocious outgoing red-haired daughter charlotte just six years old. joann recently bought charlotte a holiday dress in her favorite color -- pink -- and a pair of white boots. charlotte begged and begged to wear her new outfit early and on friday, december 14, the last day of charlotte's young life, her mother joann agreed. or parents like steve and rebecca kowalski, who lost their son chase. two days befo
bring to this debate personal experience. the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, struck a chord with americans. we have to respond. it is confiscated and hard, but we can get the job done to calibrate legislation that really is effective. love animals and music and those who mourn the lives of their teachers, principal of the school. and we have been ensuring the safety of our schools and neighborhoods and to build future of safety for all americans. with that, i'm very pleased to introduced introduced this inspiration to the nation. >> thank you, leader closely. i want to thank my colleagues. we have been here before. we have been here before. but this time, the time is different. i want to thank you for the coverage that you have given the rest of the country to read the stories that have been going on in newtown, connecticut. all too often we see these mass killings. we mourn for those who have died in the past. yet, all of our lives go on. this time it is different. we all know it. .. abbas has been great before christmas and my son was fighting for his life in icu on chris
keep these issues in the minds of your colleagues. not just in the days after newtown, connecticut, but in the days and weeks coming. >> guest: hopefully we can get together and work on the administration and we will find out what it will do in bringing all these agencies together to find out how can we work at this level to begin to help people and the funding that is necessary and will be effectively utilized at the local level. we can talk and put all kinds of care at the local level. being able to have enough information -- providing more education to people in congress. >> guest: we need to continue this dialogue with members of congress. we would like to meet with the president and discuss these issues and have an important national form as what congress can do as well to smack congressman murphy and congresswoman napolitano, thank you so much for being with us two on "washington journal" tomorrow morning, focus on gun control issues. tim huelskamp will join us to talk about the latest on negotiations on the so-called fiscal cliff. he was one of four gop members of two commit
in the connecticut state senate where he served for ten years, including six as the majority leader of the connecticut state legislature. after returning to private practice for two years, he served as the first full-time connecticut attorney general. it was during his years as attorney general that he met the love of his life, hadassah. today they have 4 children and 12 grandchildren. then in 1988, again he took on one of the giants of politics in the state of connecticut, a race that no one thought he could win, but he did. he defeated an incumbent united states senator. and for the last 24 years he served the people of connecticut and this country with honor and distinction. i was also pleased to have the opportunity to support senator lieberman's historic candidacy for vice president in 2000. joe was the first major jewish party candidate for vice president. senator lieberman is a devout observant jew. he's written a book about the importance of keeping the sabbath as a day of rest. i read the book. i was so impressed with that book. our sabbaths may be on different days, but th
to the people of coolences to newtown, connecticut. last week an unspeakable act off people killed 20 innocentdren children and six amazing adultsl change int our country and thehk committee around sandy hook elementary school for ever. as a nation we continue to stanr by the people of newtown and let them up in our prayers and i now yield to my friend, congressman andrews for any comments you may have. >> good morning, chairman, and defer beginning our gathering with the appropriate memorial to those who suffered such a loss in connecticut, and across the country. this is the committee on education and labor. and the idea that such an act of pure unadulterated evil could take place in a school in this country is not something we can easily -- suffice it to say that there is unanimous feeling i know on this committee that our hearts and prayers go out to all those afflicted by this unspeakable loss. there is a higher purpose inpurn life than politics, is lovingli, chilchildren. and extending that love to those who suffered from thisdr is something i am certainly would join you in with
couple of days for america. we're so deeply saddened to hear the news from newtown, connecticut, on friday. as a parent, nothing in life is more important than the protection of our children. the death of a child, there is no recovery from. my heart goes out to all the families who lost loved ones in this unspeakable tragedy. last night, we learned the death of -- learned of the death of our colleague, senator inouye. i want to mention today that just this past sunday, over the weekend, grief struck the capital city of kansas in my home state. officer jeff athalate fatally shot while on duty, investigating drug activity occurring inside a vehicle outside a neighborhood grocery store. as they approached the vehicle and orbded the okay -- ordered the occupants to get out the gunmen took the lives of both officers. when we lose someone in a community in kansas, it's not just a name. it's somebody we go to church with. it's somebody we know and care about. these individuals are that to their friends and family in topeka and across our state. david had been part of the topeka police
at that morning star next to the crescent moon. i thought kober. the connecticut regiment would have seen that here in brooklyn getting ready to go to white plains and again, it's dopey at least when i do it but suddenly it's that raw moment where wow, we are all tiny things. >> you talked about in your book how different areas have different revolutions but it's the same revolution but they go at it from different ways. one of the constants of the american revolution seems to be people's perceptions of washington and i'm just wondering, you stay away from the big figures and put the spotlight where it belongs on the landscape of the small people, but washington is a figure in your vote. do you come to any conclusions about this man? do come away liking him or not liking him? >> probably i mean -- >> you say he did and when the revolution. he managed not to lose up what to think is a great line. >> i think is a genius stroke. -had great conversations with artists about the revolution and there is this idea that art and ritual and reenactment, the things we used to engage with our past so
of opportunity, which has given someone like me so many opportunities. at gratitude to the people of connecticut who have entrusted me with the privilege of public service for 40 years, the last 24 in the united states senate. gratitude to my senate colleagues, who find come to know as friends and with whom it has been such an honor to serve. gratitude to all the people without whose help, hard work and support i never would've made it to the senate or state here. the gifted and hard-working staff in connecticut and washington who supported unformed and enriched my service here in the volunteers in my campaign two k. so much and asked for nothing in return, except that i do what i believe is right. gratitude to all those who labor out of view in the corridors of the capitol building, from the maintenance crews to the capitol police and everybody else anywhere in this building. thank you for keeping our capital running and keeping us safe. and gratitude, most of all of course to my family, for the love, support and inspiration dates given every day of my life. my parents, grandparents and sibling
, why there's any doubt cast upon that law by the fact that connecticut has a different one or by the fact that great britain has a different one, i don't know. under our system texas is a sovereign state entitled to have it own public policies unless they run contrary to the constitution. and fact that they run contrary to connecticut and great britain is not contrary to the constitution. so i think, i think it's a hoax anyway because i think the court would decide the same way whether or not it cited foreign law. because i think the foreign law's in there for window dressing. >> host: the, the sort of the court in some sense what you're saying is justices may know what they want to do, and they're looking for support in whatever form they can find it, but it really doesn't have -- it's really not having an impact on what they actually decide? >> guest: i think that's right. >> host: um, i want to switch to a different, a different phase of your career. you served as solicitor general of the united states under president nixon. at the -- >> guest: mostly under ford. >> host
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yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you, mr. president. i want to join in thank the chairman of the armed services committee, senator levin, and the distinguished ranking member, senator mccain, for the extraordinary bipartisan work they have done on this measure and also the accommodation and consideration they've given to all of us who have proposed amendments, as well as to their staff, and the majority leader. it has been an extraordinary work for the national defense and national security of our nation, and on behalf of connecticut, which produces many of the key products involved in this bill -- the joint strike fighter, our submarines, the sikorsky helicopter -- we have a great deal of pride in the support that the united states senate has given today to our national defense and the production of such great products, as we do in connecticut. i'm going to ask now unanimous consent that the agriculture, nutrition, and forestry committee be discharged from further consideration of s. 1947 and that the senate proceed to its
to participate with your involvement and out reach to your communities its but also connecticut and going back through 2011 and the catastrophe suffered during that period of time when you contacted me. i went them to know. thank you to senator vitter as well. also to the president to provide the strong leadership that he has and promptly declared connecticut in the regency arianna and permitted the sba to move forward with fema and i want to think those folks, those on the ground who have been there for quite some time, and fema officials in advance of the storm. many of the recent storms indicate we may face a new normal of this catastrophic weather evaded the event. we need to prepare it -- prepare long-term and short-term and that is why the suggestions and other improvements are so critically important. you need to know the connecticut sba office has approve 6.7 million of disaster assistance for struggling businesses. that figure is significant but there is a large number of requests for funding. there for a large number of homeowners need assistance for the request quite frankly is in t
independently across the colonies in connecticut and new york and pennsylvania and south carolina. and sam adams became the chief letter writer and political strategist and the story is told that a neighbor that had walked by his apartment at his house at 2:00 in the morning with see the light in his study up there and know that his pan was going scribble scroll trying to lead towards independence but sam adams really was, and of course he came along and did some remarkable things and even defended his wonderful biography and the british soldiers in the boston massacre because he believed that it was right a man of action and sam adams a man of principle. it was said of him she was the living embodiment of the principal. >> when my question is about the founding fathers. if you could go the way to pick one to go to the bar with which one would you go with and why? >> i will be honest with you. i think sam adams would be as important as he was because he didn't talk about anything but he believed in. i think i would probably pick somebody like cizik that had been he essentially a buccaneer, someb
think it's important to remind those who live in new york and new jersey and connecticut what's already being done with money we have already appropriated. for example, there are 5,460 fema personnel in those states. there are 507,000 citizens of those states who have already filed individual assistance applications. this is when your home's gone and you need money for rent or you need money to rebuild. those applications are in. already $1.09 billion has been paid to those individuals. there are 25 disaster recovery centers in new york, three in connecticut, $150 million in disaster loans for the small business administration have already been approved. more than 360,000 applications have been sent in. so, mr. president, the important thing to know is that help for victims of hurricane sandy doesn't depend on what we're about to do here tonight. we already have money in the bank. we already have fema people on the ground. there is already help. in my experience, in our tennessee disasters, that help comes in a matter of days in most cases. so what are we about to do here? as senator co
from connecticut would like to speak for five minutes. and i was hoping that we could get some time where we could go back and forth and talk about the magnitsky aspects of that legislation now. am i correct, mr. president, the bill has not yet been -- going to be reported now? perhaps we could enter into a consent as to the next 30 or 40 minutes. the presiding officer: morning business is closed. under the previous order the senate will proceed to consideration of h.r. 6156, which the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar number -- mr. mccain: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent further reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i also note note the presence of our friend, senator lieberman on the floor, who also has had a major role in this legislation. and i would hope that perhaps he could be -- i ask unanimous consent he be included in the colloquy. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: again, could i ask my friend, senator cardin, i have a statement that i wanted to make before the colloquy, and i know yo
, connecticut, 1837. c-span: what were his parents like? >> guest: his father was a very successful merchant, junius spencer morgan, who worked in hartford and then boston, and then moved to london in 1854 to become an anglo-american merchant banker. and he and pierpont, basically, were funneling european capital to the emerging american economy. i mean, we really were the emerging economy in the 19th century. he was very conservative, very upright, very much concerned to build an international banking dynasty that would rival the rothschilds and baring brothers, and he did. i mean, over the next 80 years, the morgan bank--especially in america--rothschild didn't really see what america was going to be. they had one man, august belmont, who was very good. but junius morgan staked the future on his son and on america. he was very, very supervisory and censorious and critical of his son, and determined that his son was going to be sort of an upright man with a solid-gold reputation. and pierpont was not--he was not following in the paternal footsteps early on. he was much more likely to take r
. mr. mccain: i would ask unanimous consent that the senator from connecticut be allowed four minutes, the senator from michigan allowed three minutes and i be allowed two minutes before the vote. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from connecticut. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair and i thank my friend from arizona. i'm honored to rise to support his amendment and just to make a few points. the first is to assure all of our colleagues that this is just an amendment that asks the pentagon to conduct a study. it's nothing more than that. and i want to particularly say that to reassure anyone who is concerned that somehow this is an authorization for the use of military force. look at the wording here. that's just not the case. all we're debating here is whether -- and voting on is whether the pentagon should be asked to do a study of the possibility of how we might stop bashar al-assad's air force of committing acts of murder against his own people. in my way of thinking today, the truth -- two things. one is this amendment is simply a way of saying that we in the se
from bill in redding connecticut. heine. >> caller: hello. ron paul has called for the federal reserve to be shut down. one interesting reason i thought is that he wants to bring money back to congress whereby they can do so without charging interest to itself. this is where it was done prior to 1913. it was also something that thomas jefferson and andrew jackson warned about, having these big banks take over the creation of harmony. it basically creates the money in charging interest on money that they create and of nothing to begin with. that's my question. >> guest: you know, so i have not really been focusing on money. it was really outside the four corners of my job. but what i would do is recommend to just about anyone if i could plug in the book, i'm just reading white house. i actually think that they really do a wonderful historical accounts of what you're talking about and how it applies today, so i would just refer to them because they have higher degree of expertise and i do in that area. to say it's a wonderful book. >> host: here is neil barofsky best seller, bailout, an
driveway. i stood out on connecticut avenue one time trying to measure how long it takes for 140 vehicles to pass one point going 14, 15 miles an hour. i think it probably took an hour for our battalion, the yankees from new jersey, to arrive in the south through that old lady's backyard. but a few minutes later, maybe an hour later i had gone over to where the command was in the army, and my colonel came out and said you're going to be the security officer for james maine at this time. meredith. and then i picked, happened picked the best i could find; sharpshooters, self-control. and we were not to be too close to meredith, we were to be 30 seconds of him. and by radio. and i've often said that we could only catch the killer, we really couldn't prevent harm to him because, again, he was a allowed to freely walk across the campus back and forth. so that's how the peanut -- it was called the peanut patrol. hardly something ferocious like bear or tiger, this and that. but a person came by the first day and said what are you going to call your patrol, you have to have a name for it for radi
. >> host: last call comes from bill in redington -- excuse me, redding, connecticut. >> caller: hello. as you know, ron paul has called for the federal reserve to be shut down. one interesting reason, i thought, is that he wants to bring money back to congress. whereby they can do so without charging interest to itself. as was done prior to 1913. it was also something that thomas jefferson and andrew jackson warned about. having big bank takeover. he basically charged interest on money that they created out of nothing to begin with. >> guest: you know, the focus of money was really sort of outside four corners of my job. but what i would do is recommend to just about anyone, i am reading the white house is burning books and they do a wonderful historical account of what you're talking about. also how to place today. so i will defer to them because they hide a high degree of expertise in that area. i will just say the wonderful book. >> host: here is neil barofsky's bestseller, "bailout: an inside account of how washington abandoned main street while rescuing wall street." he has been
. the presiding officer: the senior senator from connecticut is recognized. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, i guess the good news is that i'm rising today not to speak about the fiscal cliff, but what i'm speaking about is not good news because it deals with the tragic events that occurred in benghazi, libya, on september 11 when terrorists took the lives of our ambassador chris stevens and three other brave americans who were serving us there. mr. president, i rise today along with the ranking member of the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, senator collins, to submit for the record the report that she and i have been working on with our staffs and other members of the committee following those events in libya. we called this report flashing red, a specialist report on the terrorist attack in benghazi. flashing red was a term that was used in conversation with us by an official of the state department, and it couldn't have been more correct. all the evidence was flashing red that we had put american personnel in benghazi in an increasingly dangerous situation
. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i tried to help them out when they were looking for a vice presidential candidate. i did a phone call to the cuisine diversity if engine doll or haley were put on the ticket republicans could entice voters who would like to eat food that has space and nastic with the voters to think a slice of white bread is the food that will always suffice. but then at the end of one chapter says with a retail politics we see no more the candidate since albert gore gore, as referred to him as a man like object. [laughter] without the common touch that was truman's they did not seem comfortable with humans. the small talk with the citizens appe
, connecticut, where she attended school and she thrived there becoming a member of the national honor society. she's on the executive board of the student council. she's president of the interact club. she was born in colombia, but her roots are in america. and she has dreams and goals for the future, like any young woman her age. and she is proud of her connection, her roots in this country. she wants to go to college. but for so long has feared that she would not be able to go. and very briefly, she is eligible to apply for the deferred action program announced by the administration, but that program would simply give her a reprieve without the security and certainty that she needs to advance and continue her schooling. that is the path to citizenship that our dreamers need and deserve. so that they can go to school, serve in our military, give back to this country, earn their citizenship through deeds. not just words, but deeds that make us all proud and contribute to the quality of life in our nation. that's what they want to do, is to earn citizenship that so many of us take for granted
to the folks in connecticut. having experienced not as large but a similar with representative deferreds who sat next to me on the floor of the senate our hearts and thoughts got to them. even though the secretary of state is the chief election officials in arizona, the real work mostly is, the county level. within our 15 counties we have the election directors who are very bipartisan, multi partisan coming and work across party lines with them, their counties and across the county lines to try to make sure that every arizonan that is eligible to vote gets to vote. we have a very dedicated people what the county levels since kind of a misnomer to say the chief elections officials is that the state and people get the idea of the state wins elections and it's really the counties to the arizona has been served very well by having local officials elected by their friends and neighbors in those counties and communities that conduct the elections and they are more than anyone else interested in making sure that all of their citizens who aren't eligible to vote get the right to do so and make it as
senate, the attorney general of the state of connecticut, elected to the united states senate four times, a vice-presidential nominee in the year 2000, a candidate for president, and i should probably add nearly a nominee for vice president again. that he managed to achieve such prominence while being the least partisan politician i know is a credit to his character and to the exemplary quality of his public service and to the public's too often frustrated desire for leaders who seek office to do something, not just to be someone. he has been a tireless advocate for the rights of the oppressed, the misfortuneate, the disenfranchised. tireless, too, in his concern for the security of the united states, for the strength of our alliances, the excellence of our armed forces and the general progress of our values. he came here to do justice, to love mercy and to walk humbly with his god. it's hard to find anyone here who doesn't like and admire joe. he's impossible to dislike, even if you only know him a little. most of his detractors seem to be people who don't know him and who tend to view
is continuing a moment with retiring senator joe lieberman of connecticut and republican john kyl of arizona. the talk about the iranian nuclear program televised discussion of elections in muslim countries and changes in their spring countries. and several members of congress talk about their perceptions of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have
to be this political machine. but by and large it was run during these two guys in a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city and the sub title, fearless as next and political wizard, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six townsel put together. it's story, schenectady, colony in saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live and to see. there's a lot to see you next time. it's also the beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have the reputation anymore i had. >> according to author mike lofgren, "the party is over." how the republicans are crazy, democrats became useless and the middle class that shafted. mr. lofgren, how did the republicans go crazy? >> well, they go crazy when they became an apocalyptic home that lives in its own bubble. we have seen not in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most d
versus connecticut supreme court involving contraception. i guarantee you -- because i was there every republican candidate in the date has gone what? we learned a few weeks later that he had apparently been briefed and this was the beginning of the war on when to leave to women in which we discovered the law students that were not able to afford their own contraception have to have as a part of the new socialist model free contraception otherwise they will be deprived which was a symbol that we saw one article yesterday that "time" magazine maintain her as the person of the year conwell of course because after all she symbolized more than anyone else the total dishonesty with which the won the election. she's the perfect symbol of our incompetence. they clearly had a strategy, and george stephanopoulos launched a strategy. why would you want to set the date and invite the of 13? we will make a deal. sean hannity, rush limbaugh and comparable people to host the the dates. [applause] and yet we continue to pretend that the news media is neutral. the news media to send to the left. so yo
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